Last edited by Kekus
Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

6 edition of Organizational risk factors for job stress found in the catalog.

Organizational risk factors for job stress

  • 295 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by American Psychological Association in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Job stress.,
  • Quality of work life.,
  • Work environment.,
  • Employees -- Health risk assessment.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementedited by Steven L. Sauter and Lawrence R. Murphy.
    ContributionsSauter, Steven L., 1946-, Murphy, Lawrence R.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHF5548.85 .O74 1995
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 400 p. :
    Number of Pages400
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL795740M
    ISBN 10155798297X
    LC Control Number95031599

    A Study on Organizational Factors that Influence Job Stress Among Medical Laboratory Technologists in Klang Valley Hospitals Table III shows the distribution of interpersonal factor that influences job stress among MLTs in hospitals in Klang Valley. There was no significant difference in the distribution. A recent summary of prospective studies by Bonde () concluded that perception of adverse psychosocial factors (predominantly the demand–control and effort–reward models or their components but also job insecurity and organizational justice) is related to an elevated risk of subsequent depressive symptoms or major depressive episodes.

    Stress is normal. Everyone feels stress related to work, family, decisions, your future, and more. Stress is both physical and mental. It is caused by major life events such as illness, the death of a loved one, a change in responsibilities or expectations at work, and job promotions, loss, or : Susan M. Heathfield.   However, as job stress is a concept that deals with individuals, the characteristics of the individual might moderate the influence of organizational culture on job stress. Therefore, literature concerning personality will be discussed as well in order to find out how this moderator influences the aforementioned relationship.

    It includes chapters on: * environmental stress factors * psychological stress factors * work-related accidents * job stress evaluation methods With its up-to-date approach to a fascinating area of study, this is key reading for all students of organizational psychology and those responsible for workplace s: 1. Organizational job stressors are related to the organizational context, such as high workload, complexity of care and patient suffering (Andela, Truchot, & Van der Doef, ) and to inter‐personal factors, such as work‐life interference and nurses' relationships with other healthcare professionals (Liu et al., ; Schaefer, Zoboli Author: Yvonne ten Hoeve, Jasperina Brouwer, Saskia Kunnen.


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Organizational risk factors for job stress Download PDF EPUB FB2

Job stress and stress-related illness have reached epidemic proportions in the United States and are a major concern for employer and employee alike. This edited book presents the latest research on how the structure of the organization and attributes of the job contribute to or ameliorate : Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Organizational Risk Factors for Job Stress (, Paperback) at the best online prices at eBay.

Free shipping for many products. Organizational Risk Factors for Job Stress is divided into three sections covering new developments by which researchers conceptualize risk factors for job stress; emergent stressors in today's workplace, including the pros and cons of electronic performance monitoring and the stressors experienced by those who work in high-risk jobs in the Cited by: Get this from a library.

Organizational risk factors for job stress. [Steven L Sauter; Lawrence R Murphy;] -- Annotation Presents research examining organizational factors that promote or decrease job stress.

Three sections explain new developments in conceptualizing risk factors for job stress; discuss. \/\/\/ [The book] is divided into 3 sections covering new developments by which researchers conceptualize risk factors for job stress; emergent stressors in today\'s workplace, including the pros and cons of electronic performance monitoring and the stressors experienced by those who work in high-risk jobs in the health and helping professions.

Editorial Reviews. Presents research examining organizational factors that promote or decrease job stress. Three sections explain new developments in conceptualizing risk factors for job stress; discuss stressors in today's workplace, including electronic performance monitoring and stressors experienced by those who work in high-risk jobs in the health and helping professions; and outline ways.

These situations are common in the workplace, leading to organizational stress. If you do a web search for the phrases "workplace stressors" or "top 10 causes of stress at work," you'll see that there are dozens of factors that come into play.

Weak management, harassment, bullying, unsafe working conditions, excessive or insufficient workload and team conflicts are just a few to mention. 'Whether stress exists in organizations is no longer up for discussion, and its effects are equally pervasive.

In this readable book, Weinberg, Sutherland and Cooper argue for the logic and benefits of an integrated, organizational strategy to best deal with stress in by:   Introduction.

Workplace stress and burnout affects between 19% and 30% of employees in the general working population [].Job stress is the psychological distress or strain that arises from both individual and organizational stressors in the workplace [1,4].Long term job stress can lead to burnout in the workplace and is characterized by feelings of exhaustion, cynicism, detachment Cited by: Inlong before job stress and psychosocial factors became household expressions, a special reprot entitled "Protecting the Health of Eighty Million Workers - A National Goal for Occupational Health" was issued to the Surgeon General of the United States (US Department of.

Enriching the job of a person with a very low need for achievement or external locus of control may only increase anxiety and fear of failure. Care must be taken in job enrichment to match these efforts to employee needs and desires.

In addition to job enrichment, a related. Organizational strategies to reduce stress include (1) improved personnel selection and job placement, (2) skills training, (3) job redesign, (4) company-sponsored counseling programs, (5) increased employee participation and personal control, (6) enhanced work group cohesiveness, (7) improved communication, and (8) health promotion : Stewart Black, Donald G.

Gardner, Jon L. Pierce, Richard Steers. Organizational based factors have been known to induce job stress for employees at the workplace (Greenhaus & Beutell, ).

Teaching as a profession involves many complex work environment, leading too much of stress. Cooper and Marshal () stated that organizational stress includes the environmental factors or stressors such as work File Size: KB. Macro-level changes primarily consisted of improving adverse organizational factors and psychosocial exposures by addressing subthemes: training, fitness, job control, adequate staffing for assistance during calls, financial issues, social support from supervisors, trust between workers and supervisors, and by: 8.

Houtman IL, Kompier MA. Risk factors and occupational risk groups for work stress in the Netherlands. In: Sauter SL, Murphy LR, editors. Organizational Risk Factors for Job Stress. Washington DC: APA Press; [Google Scholar]. (ISBN ) contains a comprehensive summary of the latest scientific information about the causes and effects of job stress (see Vol.

1, Chapter 5, Mental Health; Vol. 2, Chap Psychosocial and Organizational Factors). Originally published in Contemporary Psychology: APA Review of Books,Vol 42(1), 77– Review of Organizational Risk Factors for Job Stress edited by Steven L.

Sauter and Lawrence R. Murphy (see record ). This edited volume is a culmination of the joint efforts of the American PCited by: at removing existing or potential stressors and prevent the onset of stress of individual job holders.

There are many organizational stressors. Therefore, the organizational coping strategies revolve round these factors which produce or help producing stresses. Following are File Size: KB.

The workplace factors can cause stress like psychosocial factors, in terms of "interactions between and among work environment, job content, organizational conditions and workers' capacities. Stress has been defined in different ways over the years.

Originally, it was conceived of as pressure from the environment, then as strain within the person. The generally accepted definition today is one of interaction between the situation and the individual. It is the psychological and physical state that results when the resources of the individual are not sufficient to cope with the Cited by:.

Workplace stress and burnout affects between 19% and 30% of employees in the general working population [1–3].Job stress is the psychological distress or strain that arises from both individual and organizational stressors in the workplace [1, 4].Long term job stress can lead to burnout in the workplace and is characterized by feelings of exhaustion, cynicism, detachment, ineffectiveness and Cited by: Industrial and organizational psychologists have a broad skill set to address occupational stress and workplace safety, due to their expertise in organizational development, job design, occupational safety, training, and employee assessment, according to Professor of .Human Factors Chapter 14 Introduction Why are human conditions, such as fatigue, complacency, and stress, so important in aviation maintenance?

These conditions, along with many others, are called human factors. Human factors directly cause or contribute to many aviation accidents. It is universally agreed that 80 percent.