Last edited by Jura
Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

9 edition of A Quetzalcoatl Tale of Corn found in the catalog.

A Quetzalcoatl Tale of Corn

Marilyn Parke

A Quetzalcoatl Tale of Corn

by Marilyn Parke

  • 227 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Good Apple Inc .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Teaching Methods & Materials - General,
  • Education,
  • Education / Teaching

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesLegends from Mexico & Central America
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages48
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8328836M
    ISBN 100866539638
    ISBN 109780866539630

    Quetzalcoatl--Tale of Corn. USA: Fearon Teacher Aids/Simon and Schuster Supplementary Education Group, ISBN X Parke, Marilyn and Sharon Panik. Quetzalcoatl- .   The Cherokee, Iroquois, and Apache all have tales about how corn came to be part of man’s diet, and these stories usually involve an old woman presenting corn as a gift to someone young. Using Corn in 7 Magical Ways. To use corn in magical workings, think of the symbolism of this hearty grain. Here are some ways you can use corn in ritual:Missing: Quetzalcoatl.

      Quetzalcoatl is the "White bearded God" or the "Serpent God" from the legend of Quetzalcoatl of the ancient Aztecs. In Mormon circles, he is often identified with Jesus Christ. When Hernán Cortés learned about the wealthy Aztecs during his exploration trip, he set out to find them. The Paperback of the A Quetzalcoatl Tale of Chocolate by Marilyn Haberstroh, Sharon Panik, Lynn Castle | at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or. Coupons & Deals Book Annex Buy 1, Get 1 50% Off: Books for All Ages Bestsellers 30% Off Hardcover New Releases from 20% Off.

      The giant Red Ants smiled proudly and handed Quetzalcoatl a kernel of each color. With the kernels in each hand, Quetzalcoatl- ant quickly turned himself back into the feathered serpent and swooped away with the precious corn. Quetzalcoatl planted the corn in the fertile earth. The Book of Mormon also claims that Jesus Christ appeared to others, following his resurrection, even to the inhabitants on the "isles of the sea." With regard to the Mexican legend, LDS Church President John Taylor wrote: The story of the life of the Mexican divinity, Quetzalcoatl, closely resembles that of the Savior; so closely, indeed, that.


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A Quetzalcoatl Tale of Corn by Marilyn Parke Download PDF EPUB FB2

A Quetzalcóatl Tale of Corn tells how Quetzalcóatl followed a trail of A Quetzalcoatl Tale of Corn book to the Mountain of Sustenance and stole maize from the gods to feed his people, while A Quetzalcóatl Tale of Chocolate tells the story of Two Wind Deer, the boy who brought chocolate to the people of the earth/5(2).

: A Teacher's Guide to A Quetzalcóatl Tale of Corn (Quetzalcóatl Tales Series) (): Parke, Marilyn, Panik, Sharon: Books. A Quetzalcóatl Tale of Corn tells how Quetzalcóatl followed a trail of ants to the Mountain of Sustenance and stole maize from the gods to feed his people, while A Quetzalcóatl Tale of Chocolate tells the story of Two Wind Deer, the boy who brought chocolate to the people of the : A Quetzalcóatl Tale of Corn tells how Quetzalcóatl followed a trail of ants to the Mountain of Sustenance and stole maize from the gods to feed his people, while A Quetzalcóatl Tale of Chocolate tells the story of Two Wind Deer, the boy who brought chocolate to the people of the earth.

Get this from a library. A Quetzalcóatl tale of corn. [Marilyn Parke; Sharon Panik; Lynn Castle] -- Retelling of an Aztec legend concerning Quetzalcoatl's gift of corn to his people. A Quetzalcóatl Tale of Corn tells how Quetzalcóatl followed a trail of ants to the Mountain of Sustenance and stole maize from the gods to feed his people.

ISBN: ; Published: Themes: Indigenous, Legend; Descriptors: Americas, Folklore and Fairy Tales, Mexico, Myths and Legends, Picture Book, Primary (ages ). A Quetzalcoatl Tale of Corn tells how Quetzalcoatl followed a trail of ants to the Mountain of Sustenance and stole maize from the gods to feed his people, while A Quetzalcoatl Tale of Chocolate tells the story of Two Wind Deer, the boy who brought chocolate to the people of the earth.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

I created my first children’s story book, “The Legend of Maize: Quetzalcoatl and the Corn Plant,” for a Cinco de Mayo party at my English training center in Beijing. I couldn’t find any other book in our library to use at the party, so I found the legend of Quetzalcoatl and retold it using art I.

The Legend of Maize: Quetzalcoatl and the Corn Plant Published on The legend telling how the god Quetzalcoatl brought corn to the Aztec people retold and illustrated by me.

He was known as the inventor of books and the calendar, the giver of maize (corn) to mankind, and sometimes as a symbol of death and resurrection.

Quetzalcoatl was also the patron of the priests and the title of the twin Aztec high priests. Some legends describe him as opposed to human sacrifice while others describe him practicing it.

An ancient legend tells the story that before the arrival of the god Quetzalcoatl, the Aztecs only consumed roots and game animals; they did not eat corn because it was beyond their reach, hidden behind the massive mountains surrounding the city.

This book informatively brings to life the myth of Quetzalcoatl, but not in a way that is particularly memorable or iconic. A good book for those studying mythology. It's a great story, and told knowledgeably, but not entertainingly. This is interesting, as it's certainly not just a dry and distant recitation of facts as many mythology texts are/5(5).

This is a legend I read about the origins of corn in the Aztec civilization: It is said that before Quetzalcoatl, the feathered serpent god, the Aztec people didn´t have corn.

They fulfilled their nutritional needs by eating roots and hunting animals. Corn wasn´t accessible because it was hidden behind the mountains; and ancient gods.

A Quetzalcoatl Tale of Chocolate by Marilyn Haberstroh,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. A Quetzalcoatl Tale of Chocolate: Marilyn Haberstroh: We use cookies to give you the best possible experience.

The Corn People, illustraded by José Carlos and translated/edited by Kelly Carlos, is a mix of Aztec and Mayan mythology, and presents a lovely creation ’s available on ’s a bilingual book, the Spanish on the top of each page, the English translation on the bottom, which I like, even though I can’t pronounce the Spanish at all.

Quetzalcoatl, the plumed serpent. (Kazakova Maryia /Adobe Stock) Exposing the Cortes-as-Quetzalcoatl Myth. The Cortes-as-Quetzalcoatl myth had been building steam for a few decades before work on the Florentine Codex began.

By the s, it had reached its final form, the one that survives to this day. Quetzalcoatl, White Gods, and the Book of Mormon by Brant A. Gardner First publshed in the blog Rational Faiths, Jan. Part I: Skin Color The Aztec deity Quetzalcoatl has entered public consciousness as the “white god.” The very fact that a Native American people would have a bearded Caucasian deity has led to widespread speculation about who might have been the real person about.

We are people of corn, corn was the primary element in mayan economy, and in today's culture almost all our traditional foods have corn in them. Tortillas, tamales, atol de elote, etc. I wish that in the research for this book more about bout Guatemala wuold have been investigated. both the author and ilustrator studied Mexican mayan history.4/5(9).

Crabtree, Parke, Marilyn, and Sharon Panik, A Quetzalcoatl Tale of Corn (Legends From Mexico and Central America), Good Apple, Politi, Leo, Three Stalks of Corn, Aladdin, Rhoads, Dorothy, The Corn Grows Ripe, Puffin.

The Discovery of Corn In a document called the Codex Chimalpopoca was written by indigenous scribes in the Aztec language of Náhuatl. It was based on the history of the Aztecs before the arrival of the Spanish and it contained a very special section called the Legend of the Suns.Quetzalcoatl, the Maya Maize God, and Jesus Christ Diane E.

Wirth Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 11/1 (): 4–15, (print), (online) Many scholars suggest that Quetzalcoatl of Mesoamerica (also known as the Feathered Serpent), the Maya Maize God, and Jesus Christ could all be the same being.Corn was first grown in Mexico between 7, years ago, and remains an important part of that country’s food preparation today.

According to Mexican folklore, Quetzalcoatl, the god known as the feathered serpent, helped the Aztec people start their corn crop.